Psychological Assessments for Kids

A licensed psychologist, Dr. Boyce provides an array of psychological testing services. Types of assessments provided include cognitive and educational evaluations, diagnostic services for disorders such as ADHD, major depression, bipolar disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, etc. She also provides various types of assessments for issues related to immigration and adoption.

Dr. Gray specializes in administering the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), considered the “gold standard” for assessment of autism. In fact, she provides assessments across the age spectrum for those with developmental needs. For those who desire to have a more complete picture of personality functioning, she administers a variety of personality tests to help with goal-planning for adolescents and adults.

Dr. Glori Gray provides Assessments in these areas: Autism Spectrum including early diagnosis, ADHD, Developmental Disabilities, Learning Disabilities, Mood/Anxiety/Depression, Kindergarten Readiness, Academic Achievement, and Developmental progress for infants and toddlers.

How to Know when to Have your Child Evaluated:

  1. What has led you to ask this question now? Is this a reaction to something specific that happened recently? Did your child’s teacher suggest that you get an evaluation? Or has your child brought up concerns about school or a change that he/she has experienced? Thinking about this ahead of time can help you describe your concerns to the school or to another child specialist.
  2. How long have you been concerned? Have you been troubled for a while, or are your concerns for your child very recent? All children struggle with various changes and in school from time to time. Usually, those difficulties don’t last more than a month or two. Extra help and support from a teacher or parent can get things back on track. Sometimes, however, a child will continue to struggle far beyond a few weeks. If that’s the case with your child, it’s important to speak with anyone who knows the child well (e.g., another caregiver, teacher, or pediatrician) about what can be done to help. One possibility that may have been tried is therapy (whether early intervention or mental health therapy). In school, the teachers may have implemented an intervention approach like response to intervention (RTI) or other informal supports in the classroom. The important thing is that you closely monitor what’s being done to see if it’s actually helping. If not, discussing an evaluation could be a good next step. If your child is still struggling, even after receiving support from a professional (e.g, a tutor or therapist, depending on the need) – then it may be time to consider getting a comprehensive psychological evaluation.
  3. How are your child’s challenges getting in the way at school? Be as accurate as possible when answering this question for yourself. Is your child having difficulty with a specific academic skill, like reading or math? Are things like planning, organization or following directions hard for her? Is she/he struggling socially? Is he/she having trouble concentrating in class?
  4. Are the challenges affecting your child in multiple settings? Have you noticed the same kinds of difficulties at home and at school? Have you heard about the same kinds of challenges from multiple teachers? Does your child seem to struggle in the same areas from year to year, even with different teachers and classmates? These questions can help you think about other factors that might be causing the challenges. Maybe your child is having difficulty with a teacher, coach, or with another peer. Perhaps the difficulties are situational and are related to significant changes in the home or school environment. On the other hand, if any challenges exist in more than one setting – an evaluation to rule out any learning, behavioral, socio-emotional or attentional issues is a good idea.


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Charlotte, NC 28204

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704-334-0524

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